Maerten de Vos (1531/32-1603) - Triptych with Crucifixion , birth and resurrection of Christ - 16th century
Marten de Vos (1532 – 4 December 1603), also Maarten, was a leading Antwerp painter and draughtsman in the late sixteenth century.

Maerten de Vos (1531/32-1603) - Triptych with Crucifixion , birth and resurrection of Christ - 16th century

Marten de Vos (1532 – 4 December 1603), also Maarten, was a leading Antwerp painter and draughtsman in the late sixteenth century.

xiuxiueig:

Minerva desarmada per Venus  (Al·legoria de la Pau Cateau-Cambrésis-1559)
Atribuit a Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)

Minerva disarmed by Venus (Allegory of Peace Cateau-Cambrai-1559) 
Attributed to Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)
The Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis was signed between Henry II of France and Philip II of Spain on 3 April 1559, at Le Cateau-Cambrésis, around twenty kilometers south-east of Cambrai. Under its terms, France restored Piedmont and Savoy to the Duke of Savoy, and Corsica to the Republic of Genoa, but retained Saluzzo, Calais and the Three Bishoprics: Metz, Toul, and Verdun. Spain retained Franche-Comté, but, more importantly, the treaty confirmed its direct control of Milan, Naples, Sicily, Sardinia, and the State of Presidi, and indirectly (through dominance of the rulers of Tuscany, Genoa, and other minor states) of northern Italy. The Pope was also their natural ally. The only truly independent entities on Italian soil were Savoy and the Republic of Venice. Spanish control of Italy lasted until the early eighteenth century. Ultimately, the treaty ended the 60 year, Habsburg Valois war.

xiuxiueig:

Minerva desarmada per Venus  (Al·legoria de la Pau Cateau-Cambrésis-1559)

Atribuit a Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)

Minerva disarmed by Venus (Allegory of Peace Cateau-Cambrai-1559) 

Attributed to Maarten de Vos (1532-1603)

The Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis was signed between Henry II of France and Philip II of Spain on 3 April 1559, at Le Cateau-Cambrésis, around twenty kilometers south-east of Cambrai. Under its terms, France restored Piedmont and Savoy to the Duke of Savoy, and Corsica to the Republic of Genoa, but retained Saluzzo, Calais and the Three Bishoprics: Metz, Toul, and Verdun. Spain retained Franche-Comté, but, more importantly, the treaty confirmed its direct control of Milan, Naples, Sicily, Sardinia, and the State of Presidi, and indirectly (through dominance of the rulers of Tuscany, Genoa, and other minor states) of northern Italy. The Pope was also their natural ally. The only truly independent entities on Italian soil were Savoy and the Republic of Venice. Spanish control of Italy lasted until the early eighteenth century. Ultimately, the treaty ended the 60 year, Habsburg Valois war.

mysticaltreats:
Maarten de Vos - The Adoration of the Magi, 1599

mysticaltreats:

Maarten de VosThe Adoration of the Magi, 1599
autruchon:

Maarten de Vos, Les Noces de Canaa (1592)

In Christianity, the transformation of water into wine at the Marriage at Cana or Wedding at Cana is the first miracle of Jesus in the Gospel of John. In the biblical account, Jesus and his mother are invited to a wedding, and when the wine runs out, Jesus performs a miracle by turning water into wine. The exact location of Cana has been subject to debate among biblical scholars and archeologists; several villages in Galilee are candidates.

autruchon:

Maarten de Vos, Les Noces de Canaa (1592)

In Christianity, the transformation of water into wine at the Marriage at Cana or Wedding at Cana is the first miracle of Jesus in the Gospel of John. In the biblical account, Jesus and his mother are invited to a wedding, and when the wine runs out, Jesus performs a miracle by turning water into wine. The exact location of Cana has been subject to debate among biblical scholars and archeologists; several villages in Galilee are candidates.

piquantpaint:
Maarten de Vos - The Family of Saint Anne (1585). 
Oil on canvas.  Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Gent.
“This family portrait came from the church of the Ghent Abbey of St Peter’s. The scene illustrates how religious art acquired secular and even middle-class overtones in this period: this panel explicitly promotes the family as the social ideal. The luminous and eye-catching colours point to the extent of the Italian influence. Only a few of the beautifully rendered figures can be identified. In the centre, we have Jesus sitting in his mother’s lap. He is looking up at Mary’s cousin, St Elizabeth. She can also be seen standing in the background, beside her son, St John the Baptist. Her husband, Zacharias, is part of the group on the left. He is the one wearing the mitre. The portico offers a second view of St Elizabeth, this time on meeting the Virgin Mary in the scene known as the Visitation.”

piquantpaint:

Maarten de Vos - The Family of Saint Anne (1585). 

Oil on canvas.  Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Gent.

This family portrait came from the church of the Ghent Abbey of St Peter’s. The scene illustrates how religious art acquired secular and even middle-class overtones in this period: this panel explicitly promotes the family as the social ideal. The luminous and eye-catching colours point to the extent of the Italian influence. Only a few of the beautifully rendered figures can be identified. In the centre, we have Jesus sitting in his mother’s lap. He is looking up at Mary’s cousin, St Elizabeth. She can also be seen standing in the background, beside her son, St John the Baptist. Her husband, Zacharias, is part of the group on the left. He is the one wearing the mitre. The portico offers a second view of St Elizabeth, this time on meeting the Virgin Mary in the scene known as the Visitation.”

necspenecmetu:

Marten de Vos, Bacchus in a Landscape, 1593

necspenecmetu:

Marten de Vos, Bacchus in a Landscape, 1593

rjtyler:

VOS, Marten de
Flemish painter (b. 1532, Antwerpen, d. 1603, Antwerpen)
The Tribunal of the Brabant Mint in Antwerp
1594
Oil on panel, 157 x 215 cm
Rockox House, Antwerp
With Pieter Bruegel, the great era of the Flemish Primitives reached a new zenith, and at the same time the beginning of the end. With the death of this master whose art was firmly rooted in the fatherland, the coast was clear for the invasion of foreign ideas from Italy. There were successive influxes of imported art from Rome, Venice and Florence, and much work produced by Flemish artists in the Italianate style, some of it without a clear understanding of the principles involved. But in all this, there was nothing which could spark off a new creative development of specifically Flemish art.
In the second half of the 16th century, many Italianate painters looked to the work of Frans Floris, which was based on the formal language of Michelangelo, and Titian and Tintoretto’s use of colour, as their ideal. One of his followers in Antwerp was Maarten de Vos, who was strongly influenced by Venetian art, but did not adopt Michelangelo’s muscular figures. He was the inspiration behind these late Mannerists and the most productive painter of his time; his death marked the end of a period in the history of art in Antwerp. Shortly after, Rubens was to return from Italy in 1608 and give a powerful new impetus to the School of Antwerp.
The Tribunal of the Brabant Mint in Antwerp is a representative example of the work of de Vos, not just as a figure painter but also as a portraitist.
The painting, which is a tableau representing justice, was painted in 1594 to hang in the Law Court of the ‘Minters’ of the Duchy of Brabant. Such paintings were intended to remind both Judges and those seeking justice of their duty and responsibilities.
The members of the Brabant League of Minters commissioned the painting, and had themselves depicted (from the waist up) in the background, behind the symbolic figures from classical antiquity surrounding Justitia herself. Justitia, crowned with laurels and holding the scales of justice and a sword, triumphs over deceit and violence, symbolised by a masked woman caught in her own web and a violent miscreant who has been disarmed.
In the foreground on the left, Moses is depicted with the Tables of the Law, and on his right the Emperor Justinian, the codifier of Roman Law. On the right there is the bearded Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, who compiled sacred laws inspired by his wife, the nymph Egeria. On the far right, Pliny the Elder can be seen, with his left hand resting on the 37 scientific works he wrote.
In a nutshell, the message of this scene is that justice triumphs over deceit and violence, and that judges should judge according to sacred and civil law, guided by knowledge and science.

rjtyler:

VOS, Marten de

Flemish painter (b. 1532, Antwerpen, d. 1603, Antwerpen)

The Tribunal of the Brabant Mint in Antwerp

1594

Oil on panel, 157 x 215 cm

Rockox House, Antwerp

With Pieter Bruegel, the great era of the Flemish Primitives reached a new zenith, and at the same time the beginning of the end. With the death of this master whose art was firmly rooted in the fatherland, the coast was clear for the invasion of foreign ideas from Italy. There were successive influxes of imported art from Rome, Venice and Florence, and much work produced by Flemish artists in the Italianate style, some of it without a clear understanding of the principles involved. But in all this, there was nothing which could spark off a new creative development of specifically Flemish art.

In the second half of the 16th century, many Italianate painters looked to the work of Frans Floris, which was based on the formal language of Michelangelo, and Titian and Tintoretto’s use of colour, as their ideal. One of his followers in Antwerp was Maarten de Vos, who was strongly influenced by Venetian art, but did not adopt Michelangelo’s muscular figures. He was the inspiration behind these late Mannerists and the most productive painter of his time; his death marked the end of a period in the history of art in Antwerp. Shortly after, Rubens was to return from Italy in 1608 and give a powerful new impetus to the School of Antwerp.

The Tribunal of the Brabant Mint in Antwerp is a representative example of the work of de Vos, not just as a figure painter but also as a portraitist.

The painting, which is a tableau representing justice, was painted in 1594 to hang in the Law Court of the ‘Minters’ of the Duchy of Brabant. Such paintings were intended to remind both Judges and those seeking justice of their duty and responsibilities.

The members of the Brabant League of Minters commissioned the painting, and had themselves depicted (from the waist up) in the background, behind the symbolic figures from classical antiquity surrounding Justitia herself. Justitia, crowned with laurels and holding the scales of justice and a sword, triumphs over deceit and violence, symbolised by a masked woman caught in her own web and a violent miscreant who has been disarmed.

In the foreground on the left, Moses is depicted with the Tables of the Law, and on his right the Emperor Justinian, the codifier of Roman Law. On the right there is the bearded Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, who compiled sacred laws inspired by his wife, the nymph Egeria. On the far right, Pliny the Elder can be seen, with his left hand resting on the 37 scientific works he wrote.

In a nutshell, the message of this scene is that justice triumphs over deceit and violence, and that judges should judge according to sacred and civil law, guided by knowledge and science.

kutxx:

Marten de Vos - Nativity -1577,
oil on panel, 
O.-L. Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp

kutxx:

Marten de Vos - Nativity -1577,

oil on panel, 

O.-L. Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp

nascent-1:
Marten De Vos, Portrait of Antonius Anselmus His Wife and Their Children, 1577

nascent-1:

Marten De Vos, Portrait of Antonius Anselmus His Wife and Their Children, 1577
nascent-1:
Marten De Vos, The Emperors Toll,  1601

nascent-1:

Marten De Vos, The Emperors Toll,  1601